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Ecosystem Services 

Science, Policy and Practice

ScienceDirect Publication: Ecosystem Services
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Using ecosystem services to underpin cost–benefit analysis: Is it a way to protect finite soil resources?
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): S. Greenhalgh, O. Samarasinghe, F. Curran-Cournane, W. Wright, P. Brown Urban encroachment onto versatile land is a global challenge, and as the pressure to develop this land mounts there are moves to assess the broader impacts of these decisions. One common decision support tool for policy decisions is cost–benefit analysis (CBA), and despite criticisms of the approach it enjoys widespread use. Using a case of urban development onto versatile rural land in New Zealand, two issues relating...
Do charismatic species groups generate more cultural ecosystem service benefits?
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): James McGinlay, David J. Parsons, Joe Morris, Marie Hubatova, Anil Graves, Richard B. Bradbury, James M. Bullock The relationship between nature and cultural ecosystem service (CES) benefits is well accepted but poorly understood, as is the potential role of biodiversity in the relationship. By means of a public questionnaire survey in Wiltshire, UK, the relationship between the presence of a range of common species groups, species group ‘charisma’, group abundance in the landscape...
Optimizing provision of ecosystem services using modern portfolio theory
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Sergio Alvarez, Sherry L. Larkin, Andrew Ropicki Portfolio selection is a flexible tool that can be used to support natural resource decision-making to optimize provision of ecosystem services. The natural resource portfolio literature includes applications in fisheries, forestry, agriculture, spatial planning, invasive pest and disease surveillance, climate change adaptation, and biodiversity conservation, among others. We contribute to this growing literature by proposing a set of essential...
Policy-driven China’s Grain to Green Program: Implications for ecosystem services
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Bing Wang, Peng Gao, Xiang Niu, Jianni Sun The policy-driven China’s Grain to Green Program (GTGP) is one of the biggest programs in the world because of its massive scales, largest investment and enormous effects. One research concern surrounding the GTGP is how to evaluate its ecological implications for ecosystem services. Taking Yangtze and Yellow river basins as the study area, we provide an overview of the development status and demand for the GTGP, construct the evaluation index...
Ecosystem services of the Big Bend region of the Chihuahuan Desert
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Nathan T. Taylor, Kendall M. Davis, Helena Abad, Maureen R. McClung, Matthew D. Moran Ecosystem services estimates have not been published for some biomes, notably desert ecosystems. The Chihuahuan bioregion, which is the largest desert in North America, exhibits high biodiversity and important cultural significance for parts of Mexico and the United States. With low levels of development, the Big Bend region is a relatively unmodified ecosystem, which makes it a good representative...
Integrating ecosystem services and human well-being into management practices: Insights from a mountain-basin area, China
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Bojie Wang, Haiping Tang, Ying Xu The integration of ecosystem services and human well-being into local management and planning remains a challenge in mountain-basin areas. We described the spatial distribution of 8 ecosystem services and analyzed tradeoffs and synergies among them in 2005–2015 based on spatial data and statistical data. Using data from a questionnaire survey, we identified the perception of ecosystem services and assessed subjective well-being. We integrated ecosystem...
Going green? Ex-post valuation of a multipurpose water infrastructure in Northern Italy
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Arnaud Reynaud, Denis Lanzanova, Camino Liquete, Bruna Grizzetti A contingent valuation approach is used to estimate how households value different multipurpose infrastructures (conventional or green) for managing flood risk and water pollution. As a case study we consider the Gorla Maggiore water park located in the Lombardy Region, in Northern Italy. The park is a neo-ecosystem including an infrastructure to treat waste water and store excess rain water, built in 2011 on the shore of the...
Governance services: Co-producing human well-being with ecosystem services
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Simo Sarkki
Key Māori values strengthen the mapping of forest ecosystem services
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Phil O'B. Lyver, Puke Timoti, Andrew M. Gormley, Christopher J. Jones, Sarah J. Richardson, Brenda L. Tahi, Suzie Greenhalgh Different value-belief systems influence the importance placed upon ecosystem services (ES) and their benefits, in particular cultural ecosystem services. We mapped forest values to interview narratives across four biocultural themes deemed relevant by Tuawhenua Māori in New Zealand: (1) importance of place; (2) capacity of forest to provide; (3) connection...
Investigating farmers’ preferences for alternative PES schemes for carbon sequestration in UK agroecosystems
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Uzma Aslam, Mette Termansen, Luuk Fleskens Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) approaches can potentially be used to protect and enhance the provision of ecosystem services. However, there is a need to assess the costs and effectiveness of such voluntary schemes. In particular there is a need for PES schemes to enhance climate regulating services in agricultural systems. In this paper we combine a choice experiment with a marginal abatement cost approach to determine the heterogeneity in...
Linking land use change, ecosystem services and human well-being: A case study of the Manas River Basin of Xinjiang, China
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Xuechao Wang, Xiaobin Dong, Huiming Liu, Hejie Wei, Weiguo Fan, Nachuan Lu, Zihan Xu, Jiahui Ren, Kaixiong Xing The relationship between LUCC (land-use and land-cover change), ecosystem services and human well-being is not only an important cross topic in studies of natural ecological and social economic systems but also the key research direction and content of the GLP (Global Land Project) and Future Earth program, indicating its significance to the development of regional policy...
Intermediate ecosystem services: An empty concept?
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Marion Potschin-Young, Balint Czúcz, Camino Liquete, Joachim Maes, Graciela M. Rusch, Roy Haines-Young
Ecosystem services trade-offs from high fuelwood use for traditional shea butter processing in semi-arid Ghana
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Godfred Seidu Jasaw, Osamu Saito, Alexandros Gasparatos, Kikuko Shoyama, Yaw Agyeman Boafo, Kazuhiko Takeuchi Traditional production of shea (Vitellaria paradoxa) butter uses large amounts of fuelwood. This study examines the effects of shea production on the environment by identifying the ecosystem service trade-offs due to the high fuelwood consumption. Fuelwood species inventories for different land use types and on-site plot-based standing biomass measured. We estimate greenhouse gas...
Uncertainties in demonstrating environmental benefits of payments for ecosystem services
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Letícia Santos de Lima, Tobias Krueger, Jaime García-Marquez Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) have become the flagship of conservation organizations in recent years. However, PES schemes are as much criticized as they are acclaimed in the literature. Researchers have pointed that many PES schemes, particularly water-related ones, are based on unreliable assumptions and lack strong causal links between land use and ecosystem services. Evidence of outcomes is hardly demonstrated. This...
Combining focus group discussions and choice experiments for economic valuation of peatland restoration: A case study in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): M. Schaafsma, P.J.H. van Beukering, I. Oskolokaite This study explores the benefits of combining results of qualitative focus group discussions (FGDs) with a quantitative choice experiment (CE) in a low-income country context. The assessment addresses the compensation needed by local communities in Central Kalimantan to cooperate in peatland restoration programs. The main policy message of the study is that such programs would have to provide arrangements that secure a stable income and food...
Understanding biodiversity-ecosystem service relationships in urban areas: A comprehensive literature review
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: October 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part A Author(s): Nina Schwarz, Marco Moretti, Miguel N. Bugalho, Zoe G. Davies, Dagmar Haase, Jochen Hack, Angela Hof, Yolanda Melero, Tristan J. Pett, Sonja Knapp Positive relationships between biodiversity and urban ecosystem services (UES) are widely implied within both the scientific and policy literatures, along with the tacit suggestion that enhancing urban green infrastructure will automatically improve both biodiversity and UES. However, it is unclear how much published empirical evidence...
Tracing the cost/benefit pathway of protected areas: A case study of the Kruger National Park, South Africa
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: Available online 22 September 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services Author(s): Louise Swemmer, Helen Mmethi, Wayne Twine The sustainability of protected areas is dependent on societal support. Protected area relevance (meaning and value) to society is based on vested interest grown through conservation related benefit accrual that outweighs costs. Protected areas generally don’t report on their total societal impact in part due to a lack of an appropriate framework that accounts simultaneously for positive and negative, tangible and intangible components. We develop...
Using image recognition to automate assessment of cultural ecosystem services from social media photographs
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: Available online 18 September 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services Author(s): Daniel R. Richards, Bige Tunçer Quantifying and mapping cultural ecosystem services is complex because of their intangibility. Data from social media, such as geo-tagged photographs, have been proposed for mapping cultural use or appreciation of ecosystems. However, manual content analysis and classification of large numbers of photographs is time consuming. This study develops a novel method for automating content analysis of social media photographs for ecosystem services assessment. The...
A bird’s eye view over ecosystem services in Natura 2000 sites across Europe
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: Available online 15 September 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services Author(s): Guy Ziv, Christopher Hassall, Bartosz Bartkowski, Anna F. Cord, Andrea Kaim, Michelle Kalamandeen, Patricia Landaverde-González, Joana L.B. Melo, Ralf Seppelt, Caitriona Shannon, Tomáš Václavík, Brenda Maria Zoderer, Michael Beckmann Recent ‘New Conservation’ approaches called for more ecosystem services (ES) emphasis in conservation. We analysed data from 3757 Natura 2000 special protection areas (SPAs) and translated positive and negative impacts listed by...
Spatially explicit life cycle impact assessment for soil erosion from global crop production
01. Oktober 2017
Publication date: Available online 12 September 2017 Source:Ecosystem Services Author(s): Rosalie van Zelm, Marijn van der Velde, Juraj Balkovic, Mirza Čengić, Pieter M.F. Elshout, Thomas Koellner, Montserrat Núñez, Michael Obersteiner, Erwin Schmid, Mark A.J. Huijbregts We derived spatially explicit erosion rates in kg of soil lost per kg of crop asa function of crop choice and management practice on a global scale. These so-called characterization factors (CFs) can be used in product life cycle assessment studies to determine the impact of crop cultivation on...

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