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Journal of Environmental Psychology

Affiliated with the Division of Environmental Psychology of the International Association of Applied Psychology
ScienceDirect Publication: Journal of Environmental Psychology
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What predicts environmental activism? The roles of identification with nature and politicized environmental identity
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Michael T. Schmitt, Caroline M.L. Mackay, Lisa M. Droogendyk, Daphne PayneAbstractAbundant evidence suggests that pro-environmental behaviour (PEB) is promoted by a subjective sense of oneness with nature—what we conceptualize as “identification with nature.” For environmental activist behaviour, however, we hypothesize that a stronger, more direct predictor is “politicized environmental identification”—identification with a group that is engaged in a collective struggle to create...
Controlling environmental crisis appraisal through knowledge, vividness, and timing
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Virginia S.Y. Kwan, Esha S. Naidu, Michael T. BixterAbstractEffective communication during disasters ensures that the public realizes the urgency of the crisis. The present research aims to identify factors that influence the perceived urgency and severity of a chronic water crisis in the Southwest United States that may lead to a future megadrought. Findings show knowledge about the interdependence of water and power infrastructures, vividness of the dreadful consequences of droughts, and time...
Fractals in architecture: The visual interest, preference, and mood response to projected fractal light patterns in interior spaces
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Belal Abboushi, Ihab Elzeyadi, Richard Taylor, Margaret SerenoAbstractThe visual patterns of fractal stimuli on a computer screen and the brightness patterns of light projected onto room surfaces have independently been shown to influence human perceptual responses. It is not clear, however, what effect would result if the same fractal patterns were projected as light patterns on room surfaces. This paper reports on the results of three studies investigating visual interest, visual preference...
Meta-analysing the association between social dominance orientation, authoritarianism, and attitudes on the environment and climate change
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Samantha K. Stanley, Marc S. WilsonAbstractRecent research highlights the importance of considering how values, ideologies and worldviews inform attitudes on the environment and climate change. Although social dominance orientation (SDO) and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) have been linked to environmentalism, the nature and extent of these relationships is unclear. We meta-analyse correlations between SDO, RWA and six indices of environmentalism from 53 independent samples identified from...
“Mother Nature” enhances connectedness to nature and pro-environmental behavior
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Ting Liu, Liuna Geng, Lijuan Ye, Kexin ZhouAbstract“Mother Nature” is representative of the anthropomorphic women-nature association in mental imagery and metaphors; however, research on the mechanism underlying this association is limited. We examined the women-nature association via implicit and explicit measurements and explored how it affected people's environmental intentions and behaviors. Study 1 found that women and men agreed implicitly that women were more closely associated with...
Outcome expectancy: A key factor to understanding childhood exposure to nature and children's pro-environmental behavior
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Silvia Collado, Gary W. Evans
Natural places: Perceptions of wildness and attachment to local greenspace
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Kathryn Colley, Tony CraigAbstractWildness is not only a quality associated with remote landscapes; it may be perceived to differing degrees in greenspaces in and around settlements. While place attachment in relation to rural wild land settings has been widely studied and wildness (or its analogue naturalness) appears to be a central dimension of sense of place and landscape preferences, little is known about the role of perceived wildness in attachment to the everyday green/blue environments...
From cash to crickets: The non-monetary value of a resource can promote human cooperation
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Brock Bastian, Marilynn Brewer, Jacob Duffy, Paul A.M. Van LangeAbstractEnhancing human cooperation in the use of limited and depletable resources is of central concern to environmental management and human welfare. Behavioral models of cooperation have, to date, focused on inter-party dynamics such as reciprocity, punishment, or reputation in distribution of resources generally indexed by points, money, or effort. We argue that these models fail to account for a key driver of cooperative...
The antecedents of place attachment in the context of an Australian national park
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Carena J. van Riper, Jee In Yoon, Gerard T. Kyle, Kenneth E. Wallen, Adam C. Landon, Christopher Raymond
When does self-identity predict intention to act green? A self-completion account relying on past behaviour and majority-minority support for pro-environmental values
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Publication date: February 2019Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 61Author(s): Fanny Lalot, Alain Quiamzade, Juan M. Falomir-Pichastor, Peter M. GollwitzerAbstract“Green” self-identity, that is, how much individuals view themselves as environmentalists, generally predicts pro-environmental intentions and behaviour. Factors moderating the strength of this link are, however, not clear yet. In the present paper, we examine how past green behaviour and majority/minority support for environmental values conjointly moderate the effect of an aspired-to green self-identity on...
Neighbourhood identification and mental health: How social identification moderates the relationship between socioeconomic disadvantage and health
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Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: Journal of Environmental PsychologyAuthor(s): Polly Fong, Tegan Cruwys, Catherine Haslam, S. Alexander HaslamAbstractLocational disadvantage has negative effects on mental health, with research showing that low (vs. high) neighbourhood socioeconomic-status (SES) predicts worse outcomes. Perceived neighbourhood quality is a well-established mediator of this association. The present paper extends this analysis, focusing on the contribution of residents' social identification with their neighbourhood. In particular, it tests a model in...
The End of Sitting: How middle-aged employees use and experience a new activity-inducing office over time
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Publication date: Available online 8 January 2019Source: Journal of Environmental PsychologyAuthor(s): S.R. Caljouw, E.H. de Haan, N. Mollee, R. WithagenAbstractRietveld-Architecture-Art-Affordances acknowledged the public health concern of sitting too much and developed The End of Sitting—a workspace without chairs that provides a variety of supported standing positions. In the current study middle-aged office workers were to use the End of Sitting for one hour per week over a ten-week period. Over time, participants reduced their changes between locations in one session while working...
Leveraging cognitive consistency to nudge conservative climate change beliefs
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Publication date: Available online 24 December 2018Source: Journal of Environmental PsychologyAuthor(s): Hunter Gehlbach, Carly D. Robinson, Christine Calderon VriesemaAbstractPeople feel motivated to maintain consistency across many domains in life. When it comes to climate change, many find themselves motivated to maintain consistency with others, e.g., by doubting climate change to cohere with friends' and neighbors' beliefs. The resulting climate skepticism has derailed discussions to address the issue collectively in the United States. To counteract these social consistency pressures...
Prospective “warm-glow” of reducing meat consumption in China: Emotional associations with intentions for meat consumption curtailment and consumption of meat substitutes
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Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 60Author(s): Danny TaufikAbstractConsumers' food choices strongly affect the environment, particularly as a result of the production and consumption of meat. From an environmental standpoint, it is important to gain a better understanding of how consumers can be motivated to eat less meat, particularly in non-Western countries where few studies on this topic have been conducted. The current study was conducted in China, where the level of meat consumption has increased rapidly. The findings indicate that...
Gender, genes, and the stress-buffering benefits of “home”: Evidence from two national U.S. studies
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Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 60Author(s): C. Dale Morrison, Michael J. Poulin, E. Alison HolmanAbstractPeople often perceive that their homes provide refuge from stress, but some homes may provide more stress-buffering resources than others. In particular, single-family homes may provide greater resources, such as status or defensible territory, compared to multi-family homes. Given historical links among gender, home-based status, and territory defense, these benefits may affect men more than women. Data from two national, longitudinal...
Emotionality in isolated, confined and extreme (ICE) environments: Content analysis of diaries of Antarctic Winteroverers
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Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 60Author(s): Bea Ehmann, Anna Altbäcker, László Balázs
The existential approach to place: Consequences for emotional experience
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Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 60Author(s): Isaac F. Young, Daniel Sullivan, Sheridan Stewart, Roman PalitskyAbstractFew theories and little empirical work has examined specific relationships between kinds of environmental experience and emotional tendencies. We present an existential approach to place that integrates the theories of phenomenological geographers – Edward Relph (1976) and David Seamon (1979) – with those of holistic psychologists – Otto Rank (1945) and Andras Angyal (1965). This synthesis suggests that: (1) people...
The restorative environmental sounds perceived by children
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Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 60Author(s): Shan Shu, Hui MaAbstractPrevious studies have reported the perceived restorative potential of environmental sounds, but have mainly focused on the perceptions of adults. This study aimed to investigate the restorative environmental sounds based on children's perceptions. In the present experiment, children aged 8–12 (N = 36) were exposed to 32 audio-visual stimuli (2 visual × 16 sound stimuli), the perceived restorativeness of which was assessed using the Perceived Restorative Sounds...
“Like a ball and chain”: Altering locomotion effort perception distorts spatial representations
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Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 60Author(s): Simon Lhuillier, Valérie Gyselinck, Léo Dutriaux, Elise Grison, Serge NicolasAbstractThis study aimed at demonstrating the role of sensorimotor information through the influence of walking effort perception on the process of route planning for navigation. Participants were asked to walk wearing weighted or non-weighted ankle belts prior to learning virtual environments. They then had to plan routes between landmarks and to estimate travel times and distances for each route. Results newly...
Disarming darkness: Effects of ambient lighting on approach motivation and state anger among people with varying trait anger
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Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology, Volume 60Author(s): Lotte Veenstra, Sander L. KooleAbstractThe present research examined the influence of ambient lighting on approach-oriented motivation and emotion. Because darkness is associated with inactivity, the authors hypothesized that dark (vs. bright) environments would lower approach motivation. Consistent with this, participants in Experiment 1 (N = 80) reported less approach motivation in a dark (vs. bright) room. In Experiment 2 (N = 112), state anger –an approach-oriented emotion-was reduced...